The Holberg Prize 2014

Michael Cook

Professor Michael Cook (1940). Department for Near East Studies, Princeton University.  Photo: Denise Applewhite, Princeton University

Professor Michael Cook (1940). Department for Near East Studies, Princeton University.  Photo: Denise Applewhite, Princeton University

Typically of a historian that knows from experience that there are always sources and perspectives that can askew our perceptions of the past, Michael Cook writes in A Brief History of the Human Race (2003) that he cannot offer any “Grand Unified Theory of History”.  Yet, Cook has with his works offered significant insights to Islamic history by means of diligent research, his philological capacity and by no other commitments than to scholarship itself. His contributions has paved new paths for the study of Islam and Near Eastern history, and his legacy will be imprinted in bibliographies in many decades to come. 

In this special episode of Udannet Knut interviews professor Cook about his decision to go into history in the first place, about his writing process, reflection about teaching and why he find it important to get the details right. 

Listen to the episode:


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Nils Klim Price 2014

Terje Lohndal

Assistant Professor Terje Lohndal (1985). Department of linguistics, NTNU

Assistant Professor Terje Lohndal (1985). Department of linguistics, NTNU

Associate professor of English linguistics Terje Lohndal is a young talented researcher and alrady an internationally recognized name within linguistics and the study of generative grammar. 

He just recently was awared the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters’ prize and can now add the Nils Klim Prize to his resumé. 

Udannet interviewed Terje a couple of months ago about why he went into linguistics in the first place and what generative grammar actually is. 

 

Listen to the episode (note: in Norwegian):

 

Udannet is a proud partner of the Holberg Prize 2014. 

The Holberg Prize is awarded annually to scholars who have made outstanding contributions to research in the arts and humanities, social science, law or theology.

The Prize amounts to 4.5 million NOK (app. €538.000 / $735.000)

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Udannet is sponsored by


Who was Ludvig Holberg?

Ludvig Holberg (1684–1754), the man for which the prize was named, was an author, playwright, philosopher and historian born in Bergen, Norway. He held the Chairs of Metaphysics and Logic, Latin Rhetoric and History at the University of Copenhagen. Holberg played an important part in bringing the Enlightenment to the Nordic countries. Through his interdisciplinary and internationally oriented efforts, Holberg endeavoured to modernise academic subjects and teaching methods. For those of you who understand Norwegian (or just like to listen to foreign languages) can check out the episode we did with ph.d.-fellow at the University of Bergen, Inga H. Undheim about the influental figure.

Listen to the episode (note: in Norwegian):

Ludvig Holberg (1684–1754)

Ludvig Holberg (1684–1754)


Holberg Prize Winner 2013 Bruno Latour

Knut talks with professor Lars Nyre about Bruno Latour’s perspectives on technology. 

Listen do the episode (note: in Norwegian)